Monthly Archives: August 2014

Just Because Men Aren’t Asked This Question Doesn’t Mean Women Shouldn’t Answer It | Linkedin

As part of the throwing down ropes to those behind you (as opposed to lifting up the ladder as you scale the ranks) females in senior roles have to shed light on the things that have made it possible. To give future female leaders tips, hope and moral support. As the number of women in senior roles grows this will obviously become less important but for the time being its critical. In that regard Telstras head of strategic finance Cynthia Whelan made a salient point. She said its important to remember that at every stage in your career you serve as a potential role model, and even as a potential mentor, for others. Even if youre only two years into your career, you have two years worth of experience on the next wave of graduates. If youve had a baby and returned to work, you can offer tips and support to other women seeking to follow that path. You dont need to be a chief executive before you can offer somebody some valuable career advice. Having said that, last weeks mentoring event proved that the combined wisdom of three female chief executives is an experience to behold. The more we hear from women like Maria Halasz, Pip Marlow and Cynthia Whelan, the better. By sharing their personal career stories of their successes, their disappointments, their challenges, their turning points they paint a realistic picture for another generation of female leaders of what is possible and why its worth pursuing. Part of that does include the way they manage the different elements of their lives.
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Just Because Men Aren’t Asked This Question Doesn’t Mean Women Shouldn’t Answer It | Linkedin

It illustrates why the debate around having it all rages incessantly not merely as a theoretical matter of public discourse, but as a relevant and practical matter of fact in the minds of many women. That there are countless column inches dedicated to the issue of women having it all and barely a word in the reverse is as telling as anything in this realm. For women having it all, shorthand for having a career and a family, is something of a mythical work in progress that relies on having a mixture of the right partner, an enlightened employer and the right support network. For men, having a family and a career is simply life. In that light questions to female leaders along these lines are frustrating. Earlier this year Tracey Spicer wrote a fantastic piece pleading with journalists to stop asking women how they do it. Last week, speaking at a My Agenda event in Sydney , Microsoft Australias managing director Pip Marlow was frank that always being asked how she juggled her career and her family was frustrating considering her male peers were never asked that question. But she said she came to recognise another factor at play. That is, because there are still so few women in senior roles, it is incumbent upon those females who are there to be honest with younger women about how they got there. As part of the throwing down ropes to those behind you (as opposed to lifting up the ladder as you scale the ranks) females in senior roles have to shed light on the things that have made it possible. To give future female leaders tips, hope and moral support. As the number of women in senior roles grows this will obviously become less important but for the time being its critical. In that regard Telstras head of strategic finance Cynthia Whelan made a salient point.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140804024204-136191530-just-because-men-aren-t-asked-this-question-doesn-t-mean-women-shouldn-t-answer-it

The ‘dean’ Of Leadership Gurus Passes At 89 – Forbes

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After serving with distinction in World War II, he studied at progressive Antioch University, came under the mentorship of pioneering management figure Douglas McGregor, and went on to create an intellectual justification for democracy as the most effective form of governance. His work at MIT in the 1960s on group behavior foreshadowedand helped bring abouttodays headlong plunge into less hierarchical, more democratic and adaptive institutions, private and public, bestselling leadership expert Tom Peters wrote in 2000.Warren and his colleagues ran experiments suggesting that, while hierarchies were the most efficient and effective way of dealing with simple tasks, democratic and collaborative groups were more efficient and effective in dealing with complex tasks. Warren realized that democracy, with its multiple viewpoints and open dialogue, gave an organization the best possible chance to address uncertainty and to adapt. That formed the basis of a famous prediction fifty years ago, by Warren and his colleague Philip Slater, that the democratically governed United States would inevitably outlast the autocratic Soviet Union. That prediction startled and amused skeptics in 1964, during the height of the Cold War. Democracy was seen, after all, as a sentimental notion and perhaps a moral imperative, but it wasnt seen as nearly as effective as authoritarianism.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.forbes.com/sites/robasghar/2014/08/01/the-dean-of-leadership-gurus-passes-at-89/